In Graham Meikle’s text, titled Future Active: Media Activism and the Internet, he discusses the reign of power of new types of media and the internet itself, because of the extent of its reach, its extremely strong scope of depth on important issues, the ability to create a solid and interactive community, and the ability to remain flexible depending on the need of the various causes that live through it. This is opposed to old-age media forms such as television and newspapers which perpetuate ideas that can help promote change but do not allow the community to contribute their thoughts and ideas, which lacks a democracy and therefore the ability to initiate change. The control of the government and other figures of authority has been lessened because of the existence of the internet, which is arguably a beneficial thing because autocratic leadership does not usually allow others to contribute their own ideas or create their own successful social movements. This also links to the idea of the media becoming decentralized through the existence of the internet as ideas are being created from many different individuals, who then proceed to gather those that think alike to them together.

Meikle also discusses both tactical and strategic media. Tactical media is when information is ‘fed’ to the masses even if they are unwilling and unexpecting it, because usually major media outlets are used or taken advantage of. On the other hand, strategic media is a type of media activism that connotes to the creation of more permanent and somewhat more alternative media outlets. He mentioned that a mix of both is required in order to create a successful media campaign. The George Bush mockery website that we discussed in class is a good example of tactical media. 

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