The Mapping Online readings were incredibly informative and helpful in thinking of ideas for our final project. Queer is in the Eye of the Newcomer introduces various concepts around race, sexuality, and gender identity. Many of the refugees were from areas around the Middle East and it’s important to remind ourselves that not “all Muslims are homophobic,” (5). Reading the stories of Aamil and Samantha are essential to getting a more holistic picture of LGBTQ discrimination and queer experiences. Modern day LGBTQ narratives are normally incredibly westernized and leave out people of color. There is a lack of representation and conversation around the intersexuality of race, culture, religion, sexuality, and gender identity.

Growing up as a South Asian American, I’ve found that there is not a lot of South Asian LGBTQ representation or visibility, in media or in the movement. This can be incredibly disheartening to queer South Asian people as it can be isolating, like discussed in the reading.

My good friend, Sam Alavi is a strong social justice activist that currently attends UC Davis. Her work addresses concepts brought up in the reading. She’s created Project Hambastegi, a multi-media project around the intersectionality of sexuality and gender identity in Middle Eastern and South Asian Communities.

Project Hambastegi, which means ‘solidarity’ in Persian, is a photo project engaging members of Middle Eastern, Muslim, and South Asian (MEMSA) communities. Through the generous support of The HAND Foundation and Iranian Alliances Across Borders (IAAB), Project Hambastegi aims to create dialogue around sexuality and gender, allow those who experience homophobia and transphobia to express to their communities how that discrimination impacts them, and let allies show support for LGBT identifying members of MEMSA communities.

Participants respond to the prompt: “What do you want to tell your community about homophobia and transphobia?”

This project was Sam’s way of creating conversation and visibility about sexuality and gender identity in her community. Illustrating that Middle Eastern and South Asian people support the LGBTQ community is necessary in breaking down preconceived notions that these communities do not.

Here are some of the images from the Project:

10339685_646192995474399_4704732235055368721_n

10418977_647311238695908_7644926781591141111_n10380891_647311348695897_781149902813817986_n

10342009_647311292029236_3372150343039098778_n10407290_647311455362553_7258903899586690859_n

10426733_659315004162198_7446808982941941259_n10357515_647324818694550_8162439367087849717_n

10452325_651472874946411_1506689887459989366_n10414500_673499076077124_426225439917843266_n10427322_652526718174360_3726319116453384996_n

What are your thoughts about the projects and some of these photos?

For more information, more photos, click here.

Advertisements

2 responses »

  1. I love this use of the “person holding hand-written sign” technique– mostly because it asks them to speak to their community. I’m interested though if these responses have been curated to portray a very open-minded response? There doesn’t seem to be much diversity, in that everyone is very supportive.

  2. hannahmwebster says:

    I look forward to reading more when I have more time this afternoon (thank you for including that extension). Regarding the impact of the photos, I find that the photographs that don’t include the faces rather leave some mystery/anonymity with just including the details that show gender, race, and maybe class, etc. (by just showing their hands and partial view of their clothing) are more effective photos to me. Perhaps its because this makes me wonder more about the individual and if I identify with that person without the distraction of more visual information.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s