Social media has had an important role in starting social movements and creating social change world wide. As Manuel Castells stated, online networks were used for revolutions in Egypt and Lybia. Today, these sites are being used in Ferguson, Missouri and in Mexico.

“Occupy Wall Street was born digital. The cry of outrage and the call to occupy came from various blogs (Adbusters, AmpedStatus and Anonymous, among others), and was posted on Facebook and spread by Twitter” (Castells, 171). Twitter and Facebook are probably the most popular social media sites that can be used to start a movement. So, it was interesting to read that Tumblr became the “go-to platform” for the movement. It became a place where hundreds of people around the country could share their story. It “humanized the movement.” People told first-person stories of hardships, unemployment, debt, etc. The power of personal narrative was used to put faces and stories to the struggles of many in this country.

The Occupy Wall Street movement rose fast because of social media, but it also faded fast after. If social media make sharing and starting movements easier and faster, does it also contribute to the fast fading of movements?

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2 responses »

  1. benliang02033 says:

    “If social media make sharing and starting movements easier and faster, does it also contribute to the fast fading of movements? ” i think this argument is really interesting. In my opinion, the fast fading of movements proves that today we are too used to follow the media. Nowadays, people lose the ability to care what they really care, most of us are forcing to care what the media expected us to care. People have to pay attention to a lot of events, and finally we pay attention to nothing.

  2. I also thought it was quite interesting that Tumblr was considered the main social media platform for this movement. Quite unexpected, but the content really seemed to fit the format of Tumblr, even if the blog itself is amazingly designed.

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