La Hora de los Hornos, by Octavio Getino and  Fernando E. Solanas was a very interesting watch not only for it’s visual qualities, but for its message and the way it packages and delivers that message. Often, films made with a social message follow a very particular aesthetic and come off as informational and preachy. That is not the case here. The film functions as a call to action through the use of a few effective tools. The first being the use of quotes from famous leaders and revolutionaries speaking of the oppression of people and the importance of rising up against the oppressor. The next tool was the use of relatable images that are not explicitly revolutionary, but can be connected to or trigger thoughts of uprising. Lastly, the use of voiceover and black screen gives the audience a space to imagine themselves in the position of those that they see on screen participating in action to free themselves. The film is very successful in creating a space that draws out rebelliousness from its viewers. an excellent example of this is the slaughter scene. While they show gruesome images of the killing of cows for consumption, there is voiceover that discusses the meat industry and how that feeds into the exploitation of the people. Not only does this create a visual/auditory connection between blood, death, gore, and the plight of the people being discussed, it also explicitly addresses factual information about those same people.

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One response »

  1. alexanderlandau says:

    I liked our discussion of the impact of the black screen in class. A black screen with a voiceover in a movie has always impacted me. But, I’ve never thought about how or why it affects me. After talking about the black screen in class, it makes sense that it gives the viewer time to process what’s going on in the film and even a space to imagine themselves in the scene. I can’t wait to notice and analyze the use of the black screen in movies I watch in the future and even explore using it in my own videography.

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