This morning I read this New York Times article I found incredibly pertinent to our class on Monday, titled “Has diversity lost is meaning.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/01/magazine/has-diversity-lost-its-meaning.html

It brings up an interesting question that got brought up in our class discussion and in the readings. Who defines “diversity” and who is representative of “diversity;”, who is straying from the “general public” — both such fluid terms that seem to have become tropes. How is one deemed worthy of filling the job title, “Head of Diversity and Belonging,” that AirBnb is apparently on the lookout for?

After, I found this article on large corporations contemplating becoming more diverse: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/06/28/new-diversity-reports-show-the-same-old-results/?_r=0

Advertisements

3 responses »

  1. lagray700 says:

    A big issue we discussed at my high school was also the difference between being a community that actually fostered and truly “enforced” diversity (susceptive) rather than being a community that simply wanted to make sure it looked diverse (descriptive). I think that often when groups or corporations say that they want to be more diverse, they often say this because they feel the need to look inclusive or progressive rather than actually caring about representing many different people with various backgrounds and experiences.

    • sonyajendoubi says:

      I think the difference between susceptive and descriptive, as you put it, is something few people understand-especially at the 5Cs. I often hear people discuss the need for campus to “look more diverse” rather than truly addressing the underlining problem. I also think looking to create a diverse visual representation on campus becomes the checking of boxes the article discusses and only creates more problems for the students who come to live on our campuses.

  2. katyschaefe says:

    This is the most Pitzer thing I have ever read. Seriously, Pitzer claims to be super diverse and open minded but is actually incredibly mono-representative in terms of race, socio-economic status of students, religious backgrounds, and social/political views.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s